Regina Romano Reynolds

Regina Romano Reynolds: Our Keynote Speaker

Video, Audio, Digital, and All that Jazz:  Bibliographic Transformation in an Era of Too Much “Stuff”

Regina Romano Reynolds

An Italian saying popularized by Voltaire asserts that the perfect is the enemy of the good. Connecting users with good content while avoiding the fake is an increasingly challenging but critically important goal.  It is also a goal that we sometimes thwart by seeking bibliographic perfection. The varied and evolving universe of online AV content, including the fake and spurious, increasingly outpaces control by traditional bibliographic practices.  Hand-crafted descriptions must give way to “semi-automated” and other bulk processes. New partnerships with data providers must be forged, library data must become connected with data produced by other expert communities, and even one-by-one hand-crafted access to rare and unique items must be aided by more fully exploiting machine intelligence.  For a linked data future, we must free our data from the boundaries of records and let our elements link up with related data. We must use automation more creatively, and build the links, using existing and new identifiers, that will be keys to connecting users to good content. 


Regina Romano Reynolds is director of the U.S. ISSN Center and head of the ISSN Section at the Library of Congress. She was a member of the U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee and co-chaired the LC group that recommended LC projects based on the report of the Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control. Reynolds is a participant in national and international groups related to BIBFRAME and linked data efforts for serials. She is a member of the ISSN Review Group. Reynolds has extensive experience in national and international standards for serials, including participation in the 2007 and current revision of the ISSN standard and NISO’s PIE-J. She is a past winner of the Ulrich’s Serials Librarianship Award and a frequent speaker and writer on ISSN, standards for serials, and the future of bibliographic control.